Marty Hiudt was awarded the inaugural Jay Price Leadership Award at the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati’s annual meeting.

Marty Hiudt was awarded the inaugural Jay Price Leadership Award at the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati’s annual meeting.

 

Marty Hiudt almost broke down talking about his friend Jay Price.

Hiudt, an out-going member of the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati’s board, was almost overwhelmed when he was awarded the inaugural Jay Price Leadership Award at the federation’s annual meeting May 15.

Price was a long-time volunteer for Cincinnati Jewish organizations who died Aug. 18, 2018. 

“Jay left an indelible mark on our community, and he would be so proud to honor Marty with this award,” said Chief Development Officer Danielle Minson earlier this year. “Marty became a good friend and mentee of Jay’s through their shared passion for and love of our community.”

Hiudt has chaired the annual campaign twice, with his wife Sally, and with Price. 

Minson said Hiudt brings his humor and wit to everything he does, and he makes it fun.

“Jay Price was a blessing to our community and to me personally,” Hiudt told the meeting. “There could no better role model of being involved whether Jewish or non-Jewish. He brought honestly insight and, of course, leadership.” 

The meeting also honored Arna Poupko Fisher with the Nancy and Robert V. Goldstein Volunteer of the Year Award. President-elect Debbie Brandt introduced Fisher calling her a scholar and critical thinker. “She is bold, thoughtful, and a visionary. Our community is better off with her.” 

Arna Poupko Fisher center, with the Nancy and Robert V. Goldstein Volunteer of the Year Award at the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati’s annual meeting. At left is Danielle Minson, chief development officer and managing director of the federation, and Deb...

Arna Poupko Fisher center, with the Nancy and Robert V. Goldstein Volunteer of the Year Award at the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati’s annual meeting. At left is Danielle Minson, chief development officer and managing director of the federation, and Debbie Brandt, federation president elect.

 

Fisher helped create the Monaco Jewish Nonprofit Leadership Institute, and is a professor in the University of Cincinnati Judaic Studies department and speaker.

Jeff Goldstein, the son of Nancy and Robert Goldstein, said she was “an outstanding choice representing the best of what my father and all of us admire in our leaders, someone with vision, with leadership, with intelligence and a passion to make a difference in our community.”

Fisher said the “Jewish processionals and professionals who work in the Jewish community need our commitment, need our investment in their ability to manage, to lead, to think, to grow and we are only as good as they are.”

Three professionals were awarded with the Harris K. and Alice F. Weston Avodah awards. The awards were established about 25 years ago to make sure professionals who make the community what it is are recognized. 

The Junior Avodah award, for a professional who has been working in the community for five years or less, was presented to Abby Solomon, assistant camp director at Camp Livingston. Solomon was described as always looking to grow the camp.

Sharon Spiegel second from left, and Abby Solomon accept the Harris K. Alice F. Weston Avodah Awards during the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati's annual meeting. At left is Shep Englander, CEO of the Jewish Federation, at right is Jennifer Clark.

Sharon Spiegel second from left, and Abby Solomon accept the Harris K. Alice F. Weston Avodah Awards during the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati's annual meeting. At left is Shep Englander, CEO of the Jewish Federation, at right is Jennifer Clark. 

 

Two Senior Avodah awards were presented this year to professionals who have work in the community for 10 years or more.

Gail Gespsman Ziegler, director of the Jewish Family Service’s Center for Holocaust Survivor, was awarded for bringing incredible innovated approaches to help those survivors to remain active, connected and valued.”

Sharon Spiegel, the Federation’s director of Youth Israel Experiences, was honored for bringing endless energy and passion and commitment to her job.” Spiegel is scheduled to retire in September.

Federation president Gary Greenberg pointed out the agency’s role as a community planner in the Aging 2.0 organization.

“What we have learned will help transform the options and lives of older adults in our community who want to stay in their homes as long as possible,” he said. 

Greenberg told the meeting two proposals for new projects have been submitted that will provide assistance to isolated seniors and those who want to age in place.

Federation CEO Shep Englander introduced Zahava Rendler, a Rockdale teacher whose son attends the Poway synagogue that was attacked last month. In a video, Rendler said, “Being a bystander is like to consent to agree what is going on. We will not wake up if we continue and we all have to work together to make it a better world to live.”

She told Englander, “We need to fight hate, we need to educate and we need to also strengthen our security.”

Safe Cincinnati was one of the first few Jewish community in America to launch a proactive strategy to help identify threats before they happen, Englander said. 

“Safe Cincinnati is not just a program … it is about all of us being vigilant and being part of our safety strategy,” he said. “There is nothing more powerful than a thousand yeses to be part of our security.

“We also have to address the undermining anti-Semitism racism and hate that fuels the violence. … By working across difference we can drive anti-Semitism back into the dark corners it came from.”

At the meeting, John Marx, who has owned with his wife Danielle Marx’s Hot Bagels for 50 years, was recognized for his contribution to the Jewish community. 

He was praised for keeping the Kosher restaurant open and inviting for the the five decades.

Marx recently sold Marx’ d Hot Bagels to Y.Y. Davis, who said he has no plans to make changes with the exception of changing the menu.

 

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