Courtesy of JTA Photo credit: Holocaust Names Monument Netherlands Jacqueline van Maarsen smiles as she examines the first memorial brick in the Names Monument of Amsterdam, the Netherlands on Sept. 23.

Courtesy of JTA Photo credit: Holocaust Names Monument Netherlands

Jacqueline van Maarsen smiles as she examines the first memorial brick in the Names Monument of Amsterdam, the Netherlands on Sept. 23. 

 

(JTA) — For a 91-year-old Holocaust survivor and friend of the renowned teenage diarist Anne Frank, laying the first brick for a new monument to victims of the genocide was a “special moment.”

“I’m satisfied that it’s finally happening,” Van Maarsen was among several dozen people, including other Holocaust survivors, who gathered in Amsterdam to lay the first part of the building, which is designed to have about 102,000 bricks — one bearing the name of each of the Shoah’s identified victims in the Netherlands.

Amsterdam has multiple monuments for Holocaust victims.

The brick laid by van Maarsen was named for Dina Frankenhuis, a secretary who was murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators in 1943 in the Sobibor death camp in occupied Poland. She was 20.

“I’m satisfied that it’s finally happening,” said van Maarsen, whose father was Jewish. “It’s a beautiful design with all the names on it.”

Her family survived the war because van Maarsen’s mother was Christian.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.